MAX CLR EPOXY RESIN – FOOD SAFE – FDA COMPLIANT

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FDA COMPLIANT FOR DIRECT FOOD CONTACT COATING
CLEAR LIQUID RESIN

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

MAX CLR is a versatile, tough and resilient epoxy resin that can be used for many other applications such as:

  • FDA Compliant Food Safe Coating *
  • Hobby and Crafts Adhesive/Coating
  • Protective and Decorative Coatings
  • Electronic Potting, Insulating, Encapsulating
  • Clear Penetrating Gel Coat Repair For Sealing Cracks

Just measure out two parts Part A to one part Part B, mix and apply and allow to cure overnight. It has a 45-minute working time and can be handled in 6 hours. Handling strength will develop in 10 hours of room temperature curing and will fully cure within 24 to 36 hours. Heat curing is also ideal for a faster cure time.

The mixed consistency is similar to a very light syrup (800 cPs).

*NOTICE REGARDING FOOD SAFE RESIN SYSTEMS

This formulation is in accordance with CFR Title 21, Part 175.300 and 175.105 for direct and indirect food contact as a resinous adhesive or coatings.

For Coatings Applications
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=175.300

For Adhesives Application
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=175.105

Proper care must be taken to ensure all usage instructions such as accuracy of mix ratio proportioning, component mixing to a homogeneous state and established curing schedule must be observed. Please make sure to review all published usage instructions and processing information posted on this item page. Proportioning the resin and curing agent by weight must be observed to achieve an accurate mix ratio and reduce the likelihood of improper proportioning.

The FDA CFR Title 21 175.300 (coatings applications) only provides a list of raw materials and chemical compounds that can be utilized for the formulation of the MAX CLR and similar resin system for the same purpose. We validate the efficacy of the MAX CLR formulation by performing our internal laboratory extractable and leachable studies and deem its suitable performance.

The user should thoroughly test any proposed use of this product and independently conclude satisfactory performance in the application. Likewise, if the manner in which this product is used requires government approval or clearance, the user must obtain and validate said approval.

IMPORTANT GUIDELINES FOR FOOD CONTACT APPLICATIONS

For food contact applications, MAX CLR A/B must be fully cured to ensure no chemical leaching can occur when foodstuffs’ come in contact with the cured resin system. Any uncured chemical compounds from the improperly prepared MAX CLR may be extracted and cause cross-contamination or leaching during food contact. Please review the following and to avoid any curing problems.

  • Check for resin crystallization.

During the colder season, the MAX CLR resin component or PART A may crystallize and must be heat-process to fully polymerize the resin system. Inspect the PART A bottle for any turbidity or any solid mass that typically forms on the bottom of the bottle. Please view the video on heat-processing the PART A or resin component.

  • Weigh or measure the components accurately at a 2:1 mix ratio.

Any off-ratio excess of either the resin or curing agent in the mixture can cause poor cure and can cause chemical leaching that can transfer to the food or beverage. Use a digital scale and weigh each component for best results, for example, a 200-grams of MAX CLR PART A will require 100 grams of MAX CLR PART B.

Careful accuracy must be observed when proportioning the resin & curing agent to ensure the proper cured performance of the MAX CLR A/B resin system. This digital scale is available on eBay for purchase.
  • Mix the components thoroughly. Any unmixed component from poor mixing will result in poor polymerization and can be extracted and cross-contaminated the foodstuff. Please view the following mixing demonstration below.
  • Allow the applied resin to fully cure for a minimum of 48 hours at 75°F before exposing the coating to any food or beverage. To accelerate the curing, a heat at 150°F for 60 to 90 minutes will ensure the resin is fully cured.
Processing Oven
If an oven is not available, an infrared heat lamp will work well for heat curing.

Parameters Of Consideration For Food Contact Coatings Per 

Title 21 FDA CFR 175.105

This product and its composition are in compliance with Title 21 FDA CFR 175.105 amd CFR 175.300
 
This product and its composition is in compliance with title 21 FDA CFR 175.xxx. This confirmation is limited to the use of this product in the above food contact applications and does not apply to any use in drug, medical device, cosmetic products or packaging. It is the responsibility of the drug, medical device, or cosmetic manufacturer to establish all materail use complies with any related government regulations.
The product may be used based on the “no-migration”-principle, i.e. if FDA – recognized migration modeling or studies show no detectable migration (transfer of substance to food) in a particular application, the product can be used legally. However, final legal compliance needs to be verified by the producer of the final article under consideration of the final application and the conditions of use of the product.

MAX CLR RESIN SYSTEM

MAX CLR COMES IN SEVERAL OTHER VERSIONS AND KIT SIZES

THE MAX CLR SERIES OF EPOXY RESINS PRIMARILY FORMULATED FOR CRYSTAL COLOR CLARITY

COLOR STABILITY THAT EXHIBITS LEAST DARKENING OR YELLOWING OVER TIME**

VERY HIGH GLOSS AND SURFACE DURABILITY

IMPACT RESISTANCE

EASE OF USE 2:1 MIX RATIO BY WEIGHT OR VOLUME

EXCELLENT ADHESION TO NUMEROUS SUBSTRATES

MAX CLR COMPARED TO COMPETITIVE EPOXY SYSTEM CLAIMING CRYSTAL CLARITY

Physical And Mechanical Properties

Viscosity

Density

Form and Color

800 – 1,200 cPS @ 25°C Mixed

1.10 g/cc

Clear Transparent Liquid

Mix Ratio

100 Parts to 50 Parts A By Weight or by Volume
2:1 (Part A to Part B)

Working Time

45 Minutes @25°C (77°F 100-gram mass)

Peak Exotherm

70°C (158°F, 100-gram mass)

Handle Time

Full Cure Time

5.5 Hours

36 Hours minimum @ 25°C (77°F)

Hardness

72± 5 Shore

Tee-Peel Strength

5.7 Lbs per inch Width

Tensile Shear Strength

1,300 psi @ 25°C (77°F)

800 psi @ -80°C (-112°F)

550 psi @ 100°C (212°F)

Elongation

9.0% @ 25°C (77°F)

Compressive Strength

2,200 psi

Heat Distortion Temp

80°C (176°F)

IMPACT RESISTANCE OF MAX CLR RESIN SYSTEM

ROTO-COATING OF MAX CLR ON WOOD TURNED BOWL

HOT WATER IMMERSION TEST WOOD COATED MUG

Wood carved and turned mugs, bowls, chopping boards coated with MAX CLR A/B

PLEASE VIEW THE FOLLOWING VIDEO DEMONSTRATION REGARDING BATCH SIZE MIXING. THE RESIN USED WAS A BASELINE DEMONSTRATIVE FORMULATION SPECIALLY PRODUCED FOR THIS PRINCIPLE DEMONSTRATION. THE FOLLOWING VIDEO DEMONSTRATES HOW THERMOSET RESINS CAN REACT WHEN MIXED IN LARGE MASS AND ALLOWED TO REACT IN A CONFINED CONTAINER.

COVERAGE AND YIELD PER GALLON

USE THESE THEORETICAL FACTORS TO DETERMINE COVERAGE TO UNFILLED EPOXY RESIN AS A THEORETICAL GUIDE. PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A 1.5 GALLON KIT AND THESE NUMBERS ARE BASED ON THEORETICAL PHYSICAL DATA. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER THE TYPE OF SUBSTRATE TO BE COATED IN REGARDS TO ITS SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND POROSITY OR ABSORBENCY.

EXAMPLE:

TO CALCULATE THE RESIN COVERAGE ON A FLAT SMOOTH SURFACE, DETERMINE THE LENGTH X WIDTH X THICKNESS IN INCHES EQUALS THE CUBIC VOLUME INCH OF THE MIXED RESIN NEEDED.

USE THE FOLLOWING EQUATION:

1 GALLON OF RESIN CAN COVERS 1608 SQUARE FEET

PER 1 MIL OR 0.001 INCH CURED COATING THICKNESS

THERE ARE 231 CUBIC INCHES PER 1 US GALLON

(LENGTH X WIDTH X COATING THICKNESS)/ 231 CUBIC INCHES PER GALLON = CUBIC INCHES OF COATING NEEDED

FOR EXAMPLE:

50 INCHES X 36 INCHES X 0.010 (10 MILS) = 18 CUBIC INCHES

18/231= .0779 GALLON OF MIXED RESIN

USE THESE FACTORS TO CONVERT GALLON NEEDED INTO VOLUMETRIC OR WEIGHT MEASUREMENTS USE THE FOLLOWING FACTORS BY THE GALLON NEEDED:

FOR EXAMPLE:

231 X .0779 = 17.99 CUBIC INCHES

OR

4195 GRAMS X .0779 = 326.79 GRAMS

FLUID GALLON VOLUME CONVERSION

1 GALLON = 231 CUBIC INCHES

1 GALLON = 128 OUNCES

1 GALLON  = 3.7854 LITERS

1 GALLON  = 4 QUARTS

1 GALLON  = 16 CUPS

FLUID GALLON MASS CONVERSIONS

1 GALLON OF MIXED UNFILLED EPOXY RESIN = 9.23 POUNDS

1 GALLON OF MIXED UNFILLED EPOXY RESIN = 4195 GRAMS

PLEASE VIEW THE FOLLOWING VIDEO FOR THE PROPER MIXING OF EPOXY RESINS. IT DEMONSTRATES THE PROPER TECHNIQUE OF MIXING ANY TYPE OF EPOXY RESIN. THE PROPER CURE AND FINAL PERFORMANCE OF ANY EPOXY RESIN SYSTEM ARE HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON THE QUALITY AND THOROUGHNESS OF THE MIX. THE RESIN AND CURING AGENT MUST BE MIXED TO HOMOGENEOUS CONSISTENCY

MAX CLR A/B AVAILABLE KIT SIZES

24 oz.
48 oz.
96 oz.
1.5 Gallon

 EPOXY RESIN MIXING AND USAGE APPLICATIONS

The use of a weighing scale is highly recommended for proportioning the 2:1 mix ratio. Resin systems used for direct food contact must yield absolute cure to ensure no chemical leaching can occur when the cured coating comes in contact with the foodstuff. Improper or poor mix ratio accuracy from using volumetric measurement may cause inaccuracy which may cause uncured components to leach from the applied coating. Use a digital scale to precisely weigh the resin and curing agent and ensure full polymerization of the resin and curing agent and prevent leaching.

EPOXY RESIN MIXING TECHNIQUE

PLEASE VIEW THE FOLLOWING VIDEO FOR THE PROPER MIXING OF EPOXY RESINS. IT DEMONSTRATES THE PROPER TECHNIQUE OF MIXING ANY TYPE OF EPOXY RESIN. THE PROPER CURE AND FINAL PERFORMANCE OF ANY EPOXY RESIN SYSTEM ARE HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON THE QUALITY AND THOROUGHNESS OF THE MIX. THE RESIN AND CURING AGENT MUST BE MIXED TO HOMOGENEOUS CONSISTENCY.

THE PROPER CURE AND FINAL PERFORMANCE OF ANY EPOXY RESIN SYSTEM ARE HIGHLY DEPENDENT ON THE QUALITY AND THOROUGHNESS OF THE MIXING QUALITY. THE RESIN AND CURING AGENT MUST BE MIXED TO HOMOGENEOUS CONSISTENCY TO ACHIEVE PROPER CURE AND TACK FREE RESULTS.

AIR BUBBLE REMOVAL TECHNIQUE

Polishing Procedure

Allow to fully cure for 48 hours before grinding

Cut or grind to shape
Sand 800 grit wet dry
Wet sand with 1600-grit sand paper
Polish with abrasive free wax or polish.

CUTTING AND POLISHING

POLISHING

BASICS STEPS OF WOOD SEALING AND WATERPROOFING

Click here to download the bulletin

View Our Wood Sealing and Waterproofing Bulletin

Fiberglassing over the seal wood for increase strength and stability

  • Choose the proper fiberglass weight and weave for the job. Here are some good fiberglass style
  • Use a plastic spreader or flat plastic spreader to consolidate the fiberglass to wood.  Use this to smoothen the fiberglass and remove excess resin and entrapped air bubbles.
  • Allow the epoxy resin to cure for 24 hours.
  • Upon cure, the cured laminate can be directly painted with a UV resistant polyurethane  or acrylic paint to protect the epoxy resin from the damaging effects of direct UV (sunlight) exposure.

USE AN INFRARED HEAT LAMP FOR LARGER PARTS IF A PROCESS OVEN IS NOT AVAILABLE

POSSIBLE HEAT CURING TECHNIQUES

If an oven is not available to provide the needed thermal post cure, exposing the assembled part to direct solar heat(sun exposure) for a period will provide enough heat cure for the part to be handled. Other heat curing such as infrared heat lamps can be used if a heat chamber or oven is not available.

SAFE TO USE ON POLYSTYRENE (EPS) FOAM FOR SURFBOARD LAMINATING

Also performs well on other surfboard foam cores such as polyurethane, polyisocyanurate, polyethylene and other low-density foam cores.

BONDING DESIGN GUIDE

Two of the major factors influencing the design of lap joints is the magnitude and direction of the load that the joint must bear. Most adhesives used for bonding flat surfaces are relatively rigid, strong in shear, and not so strong in peel or cleavage.  Thus by designing the joint so that the adhesive is in shear, the effect of peel or cleavage stress is minimized.

Lap shear joints can be affected by shear concentration when the adherents yield.  A common lap shear joint “A” in Figure 1-2 tends to deflect (yield) under stress and aligns itself to a shape resembling “B”.  Thus, instead of a simple shear stress, the tension effect at edges 1 and 2 creates a peeling stress because a high proportion of the load is carried at the edges of the lap.  Figure 1-3 illustrates several joint designs.  Some show how the problem of substrate yield can be minimized, and others show the strengths and weaknesses in various bonded joints.

GENERAL BONDING DESIGN AND GUIDELINE

SURFACE PREPARATION OF VARIOUS SUBSTRATES FOR BONDING OR COATING

In virtually every application the quality of the bond between the resin system and the surface to which it is applied is improved if the surface is clean and dry. This is particularly true of adhesive applications where stress will be applied to the cured bond line. It is also true where protective coatings are used. The following surface preparation procedures are recommended.

METALS

1. Degrease – Wipe faying surfaces with Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) to remove all oil, dirt, and grease.

2. Etch – For optimum results, metal parts should be immersed in a chromic acid bath solution consisting of:

Sodium dichromate – 4 parts by weight

Sulfuric acid – 10 parts by weight
Distilled Water – 30 parts by weight

The solution should be held at a temperature of 160°F (71°C), and the parts left immersed for 5 to 7 minutes.

3. Rinse – remove metal parts from etching bath and rinse in clean cold water (de-ionized water is recommended). If thoroughly clean, metal surfaces so treated will hold a thin film of water.

4. Dry – To accelerate drying, items to be bonded can be placed in an air-circulating oven.

ALTERNATE PROCEDURE

1. Degrease, scour and dry – Often etching as outlined above is not practical. The metal surfaces may be cleaned by degreasing as noted above, scouring with an alkaline cleanser followed by rinsing and drying.

2. Degrease and dry – Degrease the surface as noted above, sand or sandblast the surface lightly but thoroughly. Rinse with acetone or Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK), and dry

GLASS

1. Degrease – With MEK as above, or with a strong boiling solution of a good grade household detergent.

2. Etch – For optimum results, degreasing can be followed by the chromic acid bath outlined above.

WOOD

1. Sand – Bonding surfaces should be sanded lightly, but thoroughly to remove all external contamination.

2. Clean – Carefully remove all dust, or particles of wood from sanded areas. A stiff and clean brush or compressed air can be used.

PLASTIC

1. Clean – Remove all dirt, oil, or other surface contaminates with soap and water, followed by thorough rinsing and allow to dry. A solvent that does not have a detrimental effect may also be used.

2. Sand – Surfaces to be bonded should be sanded lightly, but thoroughly to remove surface sheen.

3. Clean – Carefully remove all dust or particles of plastic from the sanded area. A clean brush, lint-free cloth, or compressed air may be used.

Modified Surface Ideal For Bonding

Flame Treating Of Plastic To Improve Adhesion

Obtaining adequate bond strength when bonding plastic-to-plastic substrates or plastic to dissimilar substrates is often a challenge for epoxy bonding In general plastic surfaces demonstrates poor ‘wettability’ or the ability of a liquid to form a continuous film. These types of substrates or are called LSE or Low Surface Energy substrates and in general, most thermoplastic surfaces fall within this category.

Teflon or its generic name PTFE and other polyethylene derivatives such as HDPE, LDPE, UHMW and olefinic-based plastics demonstrate poor liquid wettability due to its low surface energy. To create a viable bondable surface condition to these types of plastics, it must be surface treated by creating a superficial oxidized surface to increase its dynamic surface tension. Various types of physical treatment can be used to increase the surface energy of plastics, mostly through oxidation of the superficial layer.

Flame treatment is the most widely used and cost-effective pre-treatment for polyethylene (HDPE, LDPE, UHMW) and polyolefin-based plastics prior to polymer bonding or printing. The resulting change of the surface by creating an oxidized layer onto the substrate greatly improves the ability of liquids wet-out the surface thus creating a strong adhesive bond between the surface and the coating.

A Flame Treating process consists of exposing the surface to a suitable oxidizing flame for a period in the range 0.2 to 3.0 seconds. This treatment brings about a change to the polymer surface that increases its surface energy allowing fluids to effectively wet-out the surface and permits a strong adhesive molecular and mechanical bond.

UHMW Sheets Flame Treated- Microscopic Surface Comparison

FLAME TREATING USING A COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE PROPANE TORCH

Adjust the propane torch so that a low oxygen burning flame is achieved and pass over the area to be treated several times until a slight haze is noticed on the surface of the substrate.
Note the fluid behavior on the flame treated area demonstrating improved substrate wetting thus making adhesion possible for polymers such as adhesives and inks.

Modified Surface Ideal For Bonding